Wednesday, September 1, 2010

I Don't Know What to Do With My Hands!

My name is Crystal Marie, and I'm a BlackBerry-aholic. I have 6 email synced to my phone, 200+ BBM contacts, and I tweet more from my phone than anywhere else. But I am not alone. One of my friends, owner of the G1 (I pity her) consistently cries, "Where's my phone?!" and all the while it's in her hand. I know people who can pick out the sound of their phone's ping amidst a riot at a live rock concert.

A few days ago, I left my charger at the office, and because my phone died, I was essentially without a phone for a full 16 hours and 32 minutes. I reminded myself that for the vast majority of humans' existence, we survived without telephones, and cell phones only as of late became a "necessity." I should be just fine! And yet, like the Internet, flat screen TVs, and Starbucks, the cell phone has changed the way we do a lot of things. I've listed a few that came to mind during those 16 hours:

1. How did you coordinate picking up someone at the airport without a cell? Few things are as unpredictable as flight-related changes. Gates change, flights are delayed, luggage goes missing, baggage claim gates are moved, and the list goes on. Without a cell phone to instantly communicate this to the driver, what did we do? You may say, "use a pay phone, duh!" Well... what if your driver is picking you up from Dulles airport, which is the most inappropriately placed airport in the country, and they're fighting traffic on 66 when you realize that you're actually going to be at Gate ZZ34 versus A23? You're calling an empty house!

2. What did awkward/asocial people in the club/lounge do without a cell? We all do it, but some are worse than others. We're out on the town, and conversation with your cohorts is almost impossible unless you want to ensure that you'll have no voice the next day. So, you scroll through your phone, send a tweet, write a text, and update your Facebook. Every time I go to a certain venue on 14th and K NW, I see members of the 9-5 crowd with their eyebrows furrowed as they tap out a supposedly extremely important email in the corner. I don't really understand why people go out amongst people to talk to a completely different set of people. What a waste! But I've digressed... What did we do with our hands in the club when we had no telly?


3. Speaking of the club, how did you ensure that the number you received was actually the giver's number, without a cell? How many times have you exchanged numbers with someone, and one person said, "Alright, I'm going to call you right now, just to make sure I have it." This method has certainly deterred a lot of fake digits and ousted many former "555...."ers.

4. An idea like Twitter or Foursquare would have never skyrocketed without the smartphone. I rarely use the Web for Twitter and at any given time, scrolling through your timeline, you see statuses that list, "via Ubertwitter, Twitter for iPhone, Twitter for BlackBerry, Twidroid, echofon, etc"

5. What was our getaway before the cell phone savior? Say you're on a first date and you realize... "This guy/girl is mentally insane!" What do you do? Fake an emergency of course, via a phone call, and you're saved by the ring! Note to those who do this: If you're going to pretend your phone rang, make sure you have it turned on silent, so that in case it does actually ring during your fake convo, your plan isn't foiled. I've been there. Smh.

What else do we absolutely need our cell phones to do?

3 comments:

  1. For 1. we used to park and look at the flight info. cell phones save parking fees, but that is still cheeper than a phone bill?

    ReplyDelete
  2. so....i'ma let you finish....(i had to sorry) but iphone has an app that calls your phone with an emergency if you need it to.....

    you can finish now!! teehee

    ReplyDelete
  3. I use my cell for fantasy football, email, movies listings, facebook more than anything.... oh yeah, I make calls and text

    ReplyDelete

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